Process and Meaning in Spatial Archaeology

Investigations into Pre-Columbian Iroquoian Space and Place

edited by Eric E. Jones and John L. Creese

"The papers in this volume are a wonderful collection of state-of-the-art Iroquoian archaeology. . . . Several of the papers will be widely cited for years to come."

—Gary Warrick, Wilfrid Laurier University

 

Process and Meaning in Spatial Archaeology examines Northern Iroquoian archaeology through various lenses at multiple spatial levels, including individual households, village constructions, relationships between villages in a local region, and relationships between various Iroquoian nations and their territorial homelands. The volume includes scholars and scholarship from both sides of the US-Canadian border, presenting a contextualized analysis of settlement and landscape for a broad range of past Northern Iroquoian societies.

The research in this volume represents a new wave of spatial research­—exploring beyond settlement patterning to the process and the meaning behind spatial arrangement of past communities and people—and describes new approaches being used for better understanding of past Northern Iroquoian societies. Addressing topics ranging from household task-scapes and gender relations to bioarchaeology and social network analysis, Process and Meaning in Spatial Archaeology demonstrates the vitality of current archaeological research into ancestral Northern Iroquoian societies and its growing contribution to wider debates in North American archaeology.

This cutting-edge research will be of interest to archaeologists globally, as well as academics and graduate students studying Northern Iroquoian societies and cultures, geography, and spatial analysis.

Contributors: Kathleen M. S. Allen, Jennifer A. Birch, William Engelbrecht, Crystal Forrest, John P. Hart, Sandra Katz, Robert H. Pihl, Aleksandra Pradzynski, Erin C. Rodriguez, Dean R. Snow, Ronald F. Williamson, Rob Wojtowicz

 

Eric E. Jones is assistant professor of anthropology at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. His research focuses on settlement ecology of pre-Columbian societies in eastern North America and Native American cultural and demographic persistence and change during European colonialism.

John L. Creese is assistant professor of anthropology at North Dakota State University. He works primarily on household and settlement archaeology in the Woodland Northeast. He has published on such topics as village spatial organization, place-making, rock art, and material culture in a variety of journals including the Cambridge Archaeological Journal and the Journal of Social Archaeology.

Imprint: University Press of Colorado

Book Details

  • Hardcover Price: $60.00
  • Hardcover ISBN: 978-1-60732-509-3
  • Ebook Price: $48.00
  • 30-day ebook rental price: $24.00
  • EISBN: 978-1-60732-510-9
  • Publication Month: January
  • Publication Year: 2017
  • Pages: 240
  • Illustrations: 58 black and white photographs, drawings, maps, and tables
  • Discount Type: Short
  • Author: edited by Eric E. Jones and John L. Creese
  • ECommerce Code: 978-1-60732-509-3