Unveiling Our New Look at the SAA

21 April 2015 Written by  

University Press of Colorado took advantage of record attendance at this year’s Society for American Archaeology annual meeting to roll out a rebranded and updated exhibit. In addition to new tablecloths and plentiful bookmarks advertising UPC's fiftieth anniversary, we also revealed a colorful new banner that features a scene from the Dresden Codex depicting Hun Ahaw on the skyband throne with the maize god Nal standing in front of him. To mark the fiftieth anniversary, we offered a 50% discount during the show and through May 31 for any orders placed afterward. Many archaeologists took advantage of the deep discount and kept yours truly busy taking orders while Jessica d’Arbonne, press acquisitions editor, held court in the booth.

A large number of new titles graced the booth, and perhaps most intriguing among them was Subjects and Narratives in Archaeologyedited by Ruth Van Dyke and Reinhard Bernbeck, one of our first forays into publishing an “enhanced” monograph. An exploration of alternate modes of communicating the results of archaeological research, the book practices what it preaches by incorporating narrative, poetry, paintings, dialogues, online databases, videos, audio files, and slideshows. These elements are embedded in the ebook edition, and, for purchasers of the print edition, the multimedia elements that cannot be rendered in print are available online.

 

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Other new titles featured at the meeting included Ancient Zapotec Religion; Animals & Inequality in the Ancient World; The Archaeology of Wak’as; Bridging the Gaps; Cosmology, Calendars, and Horizon-Based Astronomy in Ancient Mesoamerica; The Ecology of Pastoralism; The Evolution of Ceramic Production Organization in a Maya Community; Method & Theory in Paleoethnobotany; Remembering the Dead in the Ancient Near East;Texcoco; and Tezcatlipoca.

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